Friday, April 26, 2013

Wet Pinelands at Tosohatchee WMA, April 24, 2013

This was an early morning visit to Toso. It had recently rained a lot, so the woods were wet. All except one of the wildflowers pictured below are usually found in wet pinelands. The one exception was lyreleaf sage, which is found in dry areas, such as road shoulders.
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Views from Beehead Rd. Top, looking west towards the entrance. Left, recovering vegetation after a recent prescribed burn along north side of Beehead Rd. Right, a very recent prescribed burn on south side of Beehead Rd.
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Lyreleaf sage (Salvia lyrata, Lamiaceae)
Native
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Leavenworth's tickseed (Coreopsis leavenworthii, Asteraceae)
Native

Bottom image: duckweed in the background.
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Hedge false bindweed (Calystegia sepium subsp. limnophila, Convolvulaceae) Native
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Dwarf St.John's-wort (Hypericum mutilum, Clusiaceae) Native
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Purple thistle (Cirsium horridulum, Asteraceae)
Native
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Atamasco lily; rainlily; zephyr lily (Zephyranthes atamasca, Amaryllidaceae)
Native, Threatened-State
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Mock bishopsweed (Ptillimnium capillaceum, Apiaceae)
Native
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Nutall's thistle (Cirsium nutallii, Asteraceae)
Native
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American bluehearts (Buchnera americana, Orobanchaceae)
Native
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Grasspink (Calopogon multiflorus, Orchidacceae)
Native

This wildflower is new to me and to this blog. It's a terrestrial orchid. Several plants were found in the wet woods on both sides of St. Nicholas Rd. It requires recurring ground fires to maintain its habitat, benefiting from a lack of competition with other plants. These specimens were found in an area that had recently been burned and opened up. "Calopogon" means "beautiful beard," referring to the bristles on the lip.
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Sensitive brier (Mimosa quadrivalvis var. floridana, Fabaceae)
Native
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Yellow colicroot (Aletris lutea, Nartheciaceae)
Native
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Helmet skullcap (Scutellaria integrifolia, Lamiaceae)
Native
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Pine-hyacinth (Clematis baldwinii, Ranunculaceae)
Native, Endemic
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