Saturday, March 11, 2017

Malabar Scrub Sanctuary, February 24, 2017

A few wildflowers from a short walk in the Malabar Scrub.
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Tenangle pipewort (Eriocaulon decangulare, Eriocaulaceae)
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Axilflower (Mecardonia acuminata subsp. peninsularis, Plantaginaceae)
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Coastalplain St.John's-wort (Hypericum brachyphyllum, Clusiaceae)
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Wild pennyroyal (Piloblephis rigida, Lamiaceae)
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Carolina yelloweyed grass (Xyris caroliniana, Xyridaceae)
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Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Scrub Ridge Trail, MINWR, August 28, 2016

We were last here on July 10, 2016. The Florida endemic Florida Indian plantain was not yet in bloom, evident only as distinctive basal leaves. I was hoping to find it in bloom on this visit.
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Beach false foxglove (Agalinus fasciculata, Orobanchaceae)
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 Florida Indian plantain (Arnoglossum floridanum, Asteraceae)
Florida endemic

On our last visit, July 10 this year, I found a half-dozen plants along the trail. None was blooming and none had even put up a stalk, yet. I was hoping to find some of them in bloom on this visit; however, the trail had recently been mowed and widened, which wiped out any plantains along the trail. After a bit of searching I found one whole plant on a side trail, but it had already bloomed and turned to seed. Too late for the blooming. Maybe I can catch it just right next year. Early August should do it.
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Tallow wood, hog plum (Ximenia americana, Ximeniaceae)
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Piedmont blacksenna (Seymeria pectinata, Orobanchaceae)

There are only two species of Seymeria in Florida: S. pectinata and S. cassioides. The flowers of S. pectinata are hairy, while S. cassioides flowers are smooth.
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Whitetassels (Dalea carnea, Fabaceae)

In the upper right photo, a green lynx spider is perched on old flower heads of Dalea carnea.
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Monday, August 22, 2016

Tosohatchee WMA, August 22, 2016

The main objective of this visit was to confirm that Rhexia petiolata and Rhexia nuttallii occur side-by-side in Tosohatchee, in particular the east side of St. Nichols Rd.
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Fringed meadowbeauty (Rhexia petiolata, Melastomataceae)

Hypanthium is without hairs. Also, R. petiolata is generally taller than R. nuttallii.
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Nuttall's meadowbeauty (Rhexia nuttallii, Melastomataceae)

Hypanthium is hairy.
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Seaside primrosewillow (Ludigia maritima, Onagraceae)
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Hairy chaffhead (Carphephorus paniculatus, Asteraceae)

Not in bloom, yet
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Blazing star; Chapman's gayfeather (Liatris chapmanii, Asteraceae)
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Vanillaleaf (Carphephorus odoratissima, Asteraceae)
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Blackeyed susan (Rudbeckia hirta, Asteraceae)
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Green tree frog
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Thursday, August 18, 2016

Dale Wimbrow, Purple Waterlilies, August 16, 2016

On a recent visit to Dale Wimbrow Park, we found that the small pond that had been filled with cattails had been cleared of the cattails and pretty purple waterlilies now grew there. We returned on August 16, 2016 to photograph the water lilies. They turned out to be non-natives, escapes from someone's water garden. The lilies are Nymphaea capensis var. zanzibariensis, family Nymphaeaceae, common name Cap Blue Waterlily. They have been found in the wild in about 10 counties in peninsula Florida. This species has 12-24 petals, blue, lavender, or purple. Leaf margins are sinuate to almost dentate.

Dale Wimbrow Park is located on the St. Sebastian River, which can be seen in the background in the first photo below.

 




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Friday, August 5, 2016

Tosohatchee WMA, August 2, 2016

Goldenrod was the most widespread and visible wildflower seen during this visit. We saw lots of blue mist flower and skyflower. The prize sightings were fewflower milkweed and pine lily.
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Blue mistflower (Conoclinium coelestinum, Asteraceae)

As usual, the blue doesn't photograph well. Images show up as pinkish.
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 Chapman's goldenrod (Solidago odora var. chapmanii, Asteraceae)
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Semaphore thoroughwort (Eupatorium mikanioides, Asteraceae)
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 Seaside primrosewillow (Ludigia maritima, Onagraceae)
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Rosy camphorweed (Pluchea baccharis, Asteraceae)
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Blackroot (Pterocaulon pycnostachyum, Asteraceae)
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Tall elephantsfoot (Elephantopus elatus, Asteraceae)
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Elliott's yelloweyed grass (Xyris elliotti, Xyridaceae)
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Fringed meadowbeauty (Rhexia petiolata, Melastomataceae)

Common in the swales alongside St. Nicholas Rd.
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Orange milkwort (Polygala lutea, Polygalaceae)
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Coastalplain St. John's-wort (Hypericum brachyphyllum, Clusiaceae)
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American bluehearts (Buchnera americana, Orobanchaceae)
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Vanillaleaf (Carphephorus odoratissima, Asteraceae)

Distinctive leaves: wavy, curved upwards, hugging stem. Plant has a vanilla odor, especially when dried.
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Turkey tangle fogfruit; capeweed (Phyla nodiflora, Verbenaceae)
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Axilflower (Mecardonia acuminata subsp. peninsularis, Plantaginaceae)
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Clustered bushmint; musky mint (Hyptis alata, Lamiaceae)
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Carolina wild petunia (Ruellia caroliniensis, Acanthaceae)
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Fewflower milkweed (Asclepias lanceolata, Apocynaceae)
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Skyflower (Hydrolea corymbosa, Hydroleaceae)
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Showy milkwort (Polygala violacea, Polygalaceae)
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Marsh gentian; seaside gentian (Eustoma exaltatum, Gentianaceae)
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 Virginia saltmarsh mallow (Kosteletzkya pentacarpos, Malvaceae)
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Blazing star, gayfeather (Liatris chapmanii, Asteraceae)

The leaves are distinctive: Lower leaves the larger, decreasing upward.
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Catesby's lily; pine lily (Lilium catesbaei, Liliaceae)

We missed these on the way in, but spotted them on the way out, about midway on St. Nicholas Rd., west side.
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Red-headed Woodpecker

A rare sight for us; we've never seen them in Brevard Co.

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