Thursday, July 21, 2011

Enchanted Forest, July 17, 2011

Julie and I made a brief visit to the Enchanted Forest, mostly taking photos around the gardens near the visitor center. We walked a short ways down one of the trails, but the mosquitoes were vicious, so we turned back.
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Firewheel; blanketflower (Gaillardia pulchella, Asteraceae)
East coast dune sunflower (Helianthus debilis, Asteraceae)
Both native
This large patch of color greets visitors. (Photo by J.)
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Scarlet rosemallow (Hibiscus coccineus, Malvaceae)
Native
Also seen in this photo are Virginia saltmarsh mallow (the pink flowers) and pickerelweed.
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Giant ironweed (Vernonia gigantea, Asteraceae)
Native

Distinguished from V. angustifolia by being very tall (to 6 ft.) and having elliptic to lanceolate, sharply toothed leaves. (Left photo by J.)
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Bluejacket; Ohio spiderwort (Tradescantia ohiensis, Commelinaceae)
Native

 Spiderworts are normally blue, but occasionally you find one that is nearly white. Although spiderwort is a common roadside flower, this is its first appearance in this blog. The name of the genus honors the English naturalists, John Tradescant the Elder and John Tradescant the Younger; they were gardeners to Queen Henrietta Maria of England (17th c.). (Photo on right by J.)
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Firebush (Hamelia patens, Rubiaceae)
Native
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Spotted beebalm; dotted horsemint (Monarda punctata, Lamiaceae)
Native
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Winged loosestrife (Lythrum alatum var. lanceolatum, Lythraceae)
Native
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Carolina wild petunia (Ruellia caroliniensis, Acanthaceae)
Native
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False nettle, bog hemp (Boehmeria cylindrica, Urticaceae)
Native

This is a strange plant; its greenish flowers are borne on spaced clusters on spikelike branches. It is found in wet woods, bogs, and marshes. I first encountered this plant at the south end of the storm water ponds at Wickham Park.
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Swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata, Apocynaceae)
Native

This is a tentative identification of this pretty pink milkweed growing in the garden. A. incarnata is the closest match I could find based on the appearance of the flowers and leaves.
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Scarlet milkweed (Asclepias curassavica, Apocynaceae)
Not native
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Spanish needles (Bidens bipinnata, Asteraceae)
Native
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Partridge pea (Chamaecrista fasciculata, Fabaceae)
Native

(Photo by J.)
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Creeping cucumber (Melothria pendulata, Cucurbitaceae)
Native
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Tropical sage (Salvia coccinea, Lamiaceae)
Native
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