Thursday, June 16, 2011

Wickham Park, June 16, 2011

Recently I was contacted by a graduate student at University of Georgia re: Florida false sunflower (Phoebanthus grandiflorus). The student was doing research on the genetic variation of that species. He had discovered this blog and noted that I had seen Phoebanthus in Wickham Park. He was planning on visiting the area soon and wanted to know exactly where in Wickham Park I had seen the Phoebanthus. I knew I had not seen it this year, but decided to explore a wider area in this day to see if I could find any. My search was unsuccessful. A few of the plants I did find are shown here.
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This was the area in which a Florida false sunflower was found in July 2010. To the right is an Adam's needles plant where a small Florida milkweed currently can be found. This area is near the south end of the fire-break trail that runs along the eastern edge of the youth camping area.
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Florida milkweed (Asclepias feayi, Apocynaceae)
Native, Florida endemic

A singe, small Florida milkweed plant is currently growing very close to an Adam's needles plant, as mentioned above. On this day there was only one open blossom. Previously, this plant has had many blossoms.
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Small-leaf climbing fern; Old-world climbing fern (Lygodium microphyllum, Schizaeaceae)
Not native

This exotic and invasive fern was found during the Wickham Park field trip I led on June 4, 2011. It was located in the extreme southeast corner of the youth camping area. A much larger infestation of this plant was found in another part of the park and reported here on August 12, 2010.
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Rosy camphorweed (Pluchea baccharis, Asteraceae)
Native

During the Wickham Park field trip, my identification of this plant was questioned. It was believed to be Pluchea odorata, or sweetscent. Both species have a pink corolla; however, the P. baccharis has stemless, clasping leaves (as shown in the photo), while P. odorata leaves have stems. (P. baccharis was previously called P. rosea.)
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Coastalplain honeycombhead; yellow buttons (Balduina angustifolia, Asteraceae)
Native
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